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20131202
20131210
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's. my husband was a pat, pan african congress, mr. mandela was founder of anc, african national congress, others south african national union. i was used to those men and a few women shouting and screaming at each other. they were really arch rivals. when mr. mandela came, he didn't raise his voice. he didn't argue with anybody. he didn't put anybody down. they were rivals. i had never met a south african who wasn't shouting and really angry all the time. i know he was angry, but he didn't use his energy foolishly. so it was a year after that he was imprisoned. i became friends with his wife then, winnie mandela. and we continued to support each other over the years and over the oceans. and she would tell me how he was. he wasn't vitt uperative with t guards. i was part of hillary clinton's delegates when he was inaugurated. i sat there and watched the guards, who had guarded him for 27 years, sitting in the right sights, in the best seats, invited by mr. mandela. not to say look how you treated me. i'm free now and i can ya ya ya at you, not that at all. in fact, he was gracious, welcom
arrests for peaceful protests, anc's protest land mandela in prison for 27 years on charges of attempting to overthrow the government. the terms were notorious and brutal. the sentence confined him to a small cell for 27 years. for 18 of those years, mandela was allowed only one visitor a year for 30 minutes. he was able to write and receive one letter every six months and he was sentenced to hard labor. in those same decades that mandela lost his eldest son and mother, he was not allowed to attend their funerals. the miracle of mandela, after missing three decades of his life, after being closed off from three decades of change in the world mandela emerged without bitterness and without spite. upon his release mandela emerged hopeful. so hopeful he remained committed to working with the very same people who once imprisoned him all in the name of finding a solution for the people of south africa. when i walked out of prison, he wrote in his autobiography, it was my mission to liberate the oppressed and oppressor both. to be free is not merely to cast off one's chains but live in a way tha
understand from many high ranking anc officials homeland security continues to treat some of them as needing a waiver to get into the united states, which is an embarrassment and what secretary rice said today, at the time, we can't allow president mandela, a man of his stature to be continue to be treated as a terrorist by the united states. we needed to do this and do it before he passed away. but also, we need to honor his memory today by also making sure that homeland security honors of legislation that secretary kerry and for that matter senator obama when they were both senators, helped to pass. so, yes, officially they are off the terror list but the way in which homeland security continues to interpret the laws, they are creating problems for the united states. >> that history is a reminder as we're in a moment of what we call international unity, the foreign policy legacy of everything related to the apartheid regime was divided in this country and many other nations. you look at say the early origins of investment campaign where a young barack obama as a student was involved, many
in the anc's past and mandela said nice things about fidel castro and freedom in cuba that are false and that maybe because we bend over so backwards to show respect that that creates an opening. >> if there's anyone in modern history -- >> you disagree. i do, too. i'm just saying. >> we all agree if there's anyone in modern or world history that deserves sort of to be put on a pedestal, it's nelson mandela. >> of course. >> a few historical figures, right. but i think on both sides there is this danger of sort of writing out of history some of the controversial parts of his life that made him a great leader, made him able to end apartheid in that country. he took some very strong idealogical stands that are controversial to this day. conservatives were on the wrong side of history on a lot of these issues in the '70s and '80s. ted cruz doesn't have to worry about that. he's in his early 40s. he doesn't have to pay attention to that. >> what's extraordinary about mandela is his life's evolution. he started off as a militant, then was a political prisoner, then he became the national
and the anc during his long imprisonment and democrats had supported sanctions on south africa so he wanted to be there, he wanted to be at our convention. he later came to the inauguration. and then hillary and vice president gore led a delegation to his inauguration in '94 and just five months later, he came to the united states on a state visit. that's when we really started becoming friends and i had the honor of working with him throughout the entire span of his presidency and one of the things that sometimes gets lost in the incredible personal impact he made on the world because of the way he handled imprisonment is that he was a very, very good president. i think he was an extremely effective president of south africa. >> i remember when you and hillary clinton and the first lady toured that robben island cell where he had spent so many years back in 1998. what was that like? >> well, it was amazing. he talked to me about it and i'll never forget, one of the most enduring conversations i had with him over the many we had in our 20 year friendship was i said you know, i know how you
that traditional tribal situation in south africa with the revolutionary moment of the anc and with white south africans. that was another amazing triumph of his. >> how perfectly appropriate that his homecoming will be in that place that he found so tranquil and peaceful. i want to talk to you about his time in prison. did you get a sense there was a defining moment that that shift happened for him? in prison, men are broken. he wasn't broken. >> yes. whatever the psychologists said, the same fire that melts the butter hardens the egg. it hardened him, it didn't melt him. one of the things about him, the man who went to prison was a different man that came out. >> he was hot headed. >> hot headed, tempestuous. pricen w prison was the crucible that hardened him. one day he said to me, i came out mature. very rare, a mature man. >> i told you, he said it to more than just you, why he is adamant that i am not a saint. he said that often. >> i think there's a lesson for all of us. he wasn't a saint. what he was was -- and he was proud to call himself this -- he was a politician, a politician that
that. he had a great adviser who was head of the finance arm of the anc and also later became head of finance for the country who recognized that south africa had to maintain its integrity as a free market economy. and you simply couldn't give away all of the wealth and turn it over to the black south africans because in many ways they weren't prepared. you couldn't take the gold mines and turn it over to the miners. his idea was a little bit a form of affirmative action and a form of a policy called black participation in that blacks were invited to join the boards and become shareholders under a process of many of the large state-inspired companies. so he -- he was clear that the -- that a free south africa without the respect of the global marketplace in the free marketplace wouldn't be in the best interest of black south africans trying to move into the middle class. and i think he came to that very early on as he transitioned out of being a prison and head of the anc to president of a nation. >> robert, thank you very much for joining us this morning. and sharing your remembra
in that kitchen was nelson mandela. >> yes, it was actually the night of the -- when they won, when the anc won, my mom went to a party in south africa, and he pulled her up on the stage, and you can see them dancing. great picture. >> very nice. martin luther king iii, thank you so much. appreciate your reflection. safe journey as you contemplate your journey to say your final good-byes to nelson mandela. >>> we'll talk about the latest job numbers. very encouraging in many circles. good news say some with more people going back to work, but is it the temporary fix, or are we seeing the end of a great recession? i'll ask former labor secretary robert reich. he joins us next in the "newsroom." thanks for giving me your smile. thanks for inspiring me. thanks for showing me my potential. for teaching me not to take life so seriously. thanks for loving me and being my best friend. don't forget to thank those who helped you take charge of your future and got you where you are today. the boss of your life. the chief life officer. ♪ are still high in acidic content. if your enamel is exposed to aci
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8